If you really understand the emptiness of your primary practices, they become much, much more powerful. This is our third course covering the most famous of all works by Nagarjuna (c. 200AD) which he named simply “Wisdom”. For 2000 years, hundreds of commentaries were written about these 27 chapters in poetry. And it is really all the emptiness teachings that you've ever heard. All the emptiness teachings in Tibet, China, Korea, and Japan are based on Nagarjuna's "Wisdom".
Around 1000 AD, 1500 years after the time of the Buddha, the Tibetans undertook a monumental task: to translate thousands of pages of Buddhist literature from Sanskrit into Tibetan. It took them 700 years to complete translations of the kangyur (the word of the Buddha) and the tengyur (the Indian commentaries). Now, as Buddhism has been making a big push westward, Geshe Michael’s aim is to complete an even larger task: to translate hundreds of thousands of pages of Buddhist literature into modern languages.
Christians generally recognize a special presence of Christ in this rite, though they differ about exactly how, where, and when Christ is present. While all agree that there is no perceptible change in the elements, some believe that they actually become the body and blood of Christ, others believe in a “real” but merely spiritual presence of Christ in the Eucharist, and still others take the act to be only a symbolic reenactment of the Last Supper. In this lecture give at St. Philip’s in the Hills Episcopal Church in 2010, Geshe Michael talks about faith and the transformation of the eucharist based on the perspective of the Buddhist ideas of karma and emptiness.
The Heart Sutra is one of the most popular prayers in Buddhism. It contains seemingly mystical, impenetrable verses that describe how reality does exist, and the way in which it does not exist. This meditation penetrates into the real meaning of the sutra, which describes how our very nature, including our bodies, minds and identities are not what they appear to be. We meditate on the very nature of ultimate reality (emptiness) to discover where things come from and how they really exist. This is an excellent introductory overview meditation on emptiness. This topic was covered twice, each time with a different emphasis, and both versions have been provided.
The Heart Sutra is one of the most popular prayers in Buddhism. It contains seemingly mystical, impenetrable verses that describe how reality does exist, and the way in which it does not exist. This meditation penetrates into the real meaning of the sutra, which describes how our very nature, including our bodies, minds and identities are not what they appear to be. We meditate on the very nature of ultimate reality (emptiness) to discover where things come from and how they really exist. This is an excellent introductory overview meditation on emptiness.
Here is a collection of Idea Images (Idims) which represent all the important ideas of this course. It's a great tool to connect the image mentally with the important idea. There's a tradition in this lineage that when you learn a topic you review it at least two times after the class. Preferably once on the day of the class and preferably once the next day or two days later. Please Note: To make this an even more powerful study tool we linked each image to the exact time in the video where Geshe Michael explains the important idea. You can just click on each Idim and it will open the video at the precise location.
In these 15 classes, we will continue our exploration of Nagarjuna’s Wisdom, the most famous book ever written on Buddhism’s most important idea: emptiness, which clarified and became the basis of all subsequent emptiness teachings. Geshe Michael Roach will lead us through an investigation into the flow and the deeper meaning of Nagarjuna’s writings, and how to apply his understanding practically into our daily lives. Each of Wisdom’s 27 chapters of poetry presents an investigation of a unique idea or question to help us understand that the way we *believe* things work in our world perhaps is more than suspect. For almost 2000 years people have studied these poems and wondered what the meaning is behind the order of these chapters and what is the connection between each of the ideas presented. While some of the chapters obviously belong together, it requires a deep examination to discern what Nagarjuna had in mind.
If you really understand the emptiness of your primary practices, they become much, much more powerful. This is our third course covering the most famous of all works by Nagarjuna (c. 200AD) which he named simply “Wisdom”. For 2000 years, hundreds of commentaries were written about these 27 chapters in poetry. And it is really all the emptiness teachings that you've ever heard. All the emptiness teachings in Tibet, China, Korea, and Japan are based on Nagarjuna's "Wisdom".
If you really understand the emptiness of your primary practices, they become much, much more powerful. This is our third course covering the most famous of all works by Nagarjuna (c. 200AD) which he named simply “Wisdom”. For 2000 years, hundreds of commentaries were written about these 27 chapters in poetry. And it is really all the emptiness teachings that you've ever heard. All the emptiness teachings in Tibet, China, Korea, and Japan are based on Nagarjuna's "Wisdom".