Topics include: The importance of evaluating spiritual teachings, how to interpret when spiritual teachings are literal or figurative, how to evaluate apparently conflicting teachings, a summary of the teachings Lord Buddha gave in each of the three Turnings of the Wheel of the Dharma, the goal of each of the three Turnings of the Wheel, an explanation of the ideas held by each of the main schools of Buddhism, ultimate reality (emptiness) according to each of the schools, the three progressively higher understandings of emptiness, the three attributes of reality, a comparison of the Mind- Only School and the Middle- Way School explanations of emptiness and dependent origination, how to use an understanding of emptiness to stop all your suffering, and how to stop your aging and death by stopping your ignorance. Read More
The fifteen Formal Study Courses cover the main ideas of the entire course of study followed by a Tibetan monk-scholar (or geshe) at one of the great monasteries of Tibet. The three-part Great Ideas series summarizes all fifteen ACI Courses, along with the teachings of the traditional training of a Tibetan Buddhist Master. In part one, we cover the first five ACI Courses: The Principal Teachings of Buddhism, Buddhist Refuge, Applied Meditation, Proof of Future Lives, and How Karma Works. Read More
The fifteen Formal Study Courses cover the main ideas of the entire course of study followed by a Tibetan monk-scholar (or geshe) at one of the great monasteries of Tibet. This course summarizes the great ideas of the ACI Course Six through Ten. The first half of each class in this course was taught by Geshe Michael and is available below. Read More
The fifteen Formal Study Courses cover the main ideas of the entire course of study followed by a Tibetan monk-scholar (or geshe) at one of the great monasteries of Tibet. This course summarizes the great ideas of the ACI Course Eleven through Fifteen. The first half of each class in this course was taught by Geshe Michael and is available below. Read More
The four universal dreams: We’ve already mentioned briefly the four dreams that almost everyone has in their life. Believe me, the real reason that your students have come to your yoga class has something to do with one of these four dreams: financial security, a relationship with a good partner, staying young & healthy, and somehow being of service to the entire world. Read More
If one task is to get people to come back to yoga class, another is to inspire them to do their yoga practice daily, if only for a short amount of time. Anyone who has truly gotten deep benefit out of yoga knows that this requires a daily practice—opening up the channels and chakras is really a lot easier with a modest, regular, daily practice. Here then are some tips for getting people to actually do a daily practice. Read More
If they don’t come back, it doesn’t matter what you can teach. As a yoga teacher, we need to spend a lot of time thinking about how to make our class a pleasant, enjoyable, uplifting experience. The goal of having a class is to help the student. We can’t help them if they have an unpleasant experience in our class and don’t come back. Read More
This then is how, historically, the ancient scriptures of Buddhism describe the first moments of ultimate love—love for all living creatures, which in Buddhism is called bodhichitta. There is a crucial time in the life of a being who is striving for enlightenment: they are faced with decisive moment of personal torment, and they make a decision to take it on gladly, with a prayer that it may substitute for the pain of every other living being. Read More
The original purpose of the yoga asanas, of course, was to reach in from the outside to affect the inner channels, or nadis, through which prana and our thoughts travel, linked together. We thus loosen up chokepoints in the inner channels, where they twine around each other and form the circular-shaped “wheels,” or chakras. Read More
This post presents a summary of the different chakras, including their ancient names, general location, and function—according to traditional Indian and Tibetan sources. These sources often differ from each other in specific details; these differences often have a specific purpose and are not just mistakes. Read More
Learning to breath properly during asana is essential in getting prana or inner wind to move through the body properly—which is the whole point of the asana. Throughout any practice of yoga asana, it’s important to maintain what’s called ujjayi breathing in Sanskrit. The throat is lightly constricted to make what’s been called a “Darth Vader” sound, or heavy breathing sound, as you practice. Read More
Michael Roach, primer monje budista estadounidense que alcanzó el grado de Gueshe y uno de los más populares profesores de Budismo Tibetano en Occidente, vendrá al Perú como parte su gira internacional del presente año. Roach, conocido popularmente como Gueshe Michael, ofrecido tres distintas conferencias públicas en Lima, que se celebró en el Auditorio Juan Julio Wicht, de la Universidad del Pacífico. Read More
The following bit of advice on how to finish our yoga practice was excerpted from The Crystal Mirror which Reveals the Machine of the Body: a book of instruction which grants—within a single year, or at least within this single lifetime—both the highest spiritual goals and the worldly goals of this life (Trulkor Selway Melong), compiled by Marpa the Translator, also known as Marpa Chukyi Lodro (1012-1097). Read More
In this class, Geshe Michael teaches a simple and profound practice on how to track your actions, words and thoughts throughout the day using a book. This easy and amazing practice has changed the lives of thousands of people. Check it out and give it a try. Read More